Bering Land Bridge National Preserve on the map. How to get by car to the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

Pacific Coast of America

modern advanced road atlas

Detailed highway and road maps of Pacific coast of North America free

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve on the map. How to get by car to the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. How to book a room and its price in the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

 

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

In the west, on Seward Peninsula, near Nome

 

The preserve is a remnant of the land bridge that connected Asia to North America more than 13,000 years ago. The land bridge is now beneath the Chukchi Sea and the Bering Sea. During the glacial epoch, whenever ocean levels fell enough to expose the land bridge, people and animals migrated into the area. Archaeologists agree that it was across this Bering Land Bridge, also called Beringia, that humans first passed between Asia and northwestern Alaska. The preserve is home to paleontological and archaeological resources, large populations of migratory birds, wildlife (including brown bear, moose, caribou, and reindeer), and ash explosion craters and lava flows. The park was proclaimed a national monument in 1978 and a preserve in 1980.

 

WHAT TO SEE & DO

Arts and crafts, backpacking, bird-watching, canoeing, coastal boating, cross-country skiing, dogsledding, exploring ancient Eskimo and gold rush-era remains, fishing, hiking, hunting, observing Eskimo reindeer herding, river floating, snowmobiling. Facilities: Visitor center (240 Front St., Nome). Programs & Events: Interpretive talks, demonstrations, Junior Ranger Program (all June-Aug.). Tips & Hints: Be prepared to be self-sufficient. Exposure and hypothermia are threats throughout the year. Temperatures in summer are usually around 50°F on the coast and 65°F-75°F inland. Snow, freezing temperatures, and long periods of clouds, rain, and wind are possible year-round. Summer days are long, almost without darkness. Average Jan. lows are -15°F on the coast and -50°F in the interior. Winds average 8-12 mph but can reach 70 mph in storms. Winter days are short, with only a few hours of light. Go May-June for rare migratory bird viewing. Busiest June-Aug., least crowded Jan. and Feb.

 

FOOD, LODGING & SUPPLIES

Camping: In the park: Serpentine Hot Springs (west side of park near Taylor; primitive cabin with 20 bunk beds; free). 6 primitive cabins scattered elsewhere in park. Backcountry camping allowed. Nearby: Salmon Lake Park Campground (north end of Salmon Lake, 38 mi north of Nome, tel. 907/443-2177; 9 sites; free).  Hotels: None in park. In Nome: Nome Nugget Inn (315 W. Front St., tel. 907/443-2323 or 877/ 443-2323; 47 rooms; $90-$100), Aurora Inn (302 E. Front St., tel. 907/ 443-3838 or 800/354-^606; 68 rooms; $139-$225). X Restaurants: None in park. In Nome: Fat Freddies Restaurant (100 Front St., tel. 907/443-5899; $7-$13), Fort Davis Roadhouse (224 Front St., tel. 907/443-5191; $10-$15). 6 Groceries & Gear: None in park. In Nome: The Country Store (1008 E. Front St., tel. 907/443-5666 or 800/478-3297).

 

FEES, HOURS & REGULATIONS

Free. Alaska hunting and fishing licenses required. No helicopters or all-terrain vehicles. Preserve open daily.

 

HOW TO GET THERE

Accessible only by foot travel, small aircraft, and boats in summer and fall, by snowmobile, dogsled, cross-country skis, or small plane on skis in winter and spring. Closest airports: Kotzebue, Nome.

 

CONTACTS

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve (Box 220, Nome, AK 99762, tel. 907/443-2522,). Western Arctic National Parkland  (Box 1029, Kotzebue, AK 99752, tel. 800/478-7252). Nome Convention & Visitors Bureau (Box 240, Nome, AK 99762, tel. 907/443-6624, fax 907/443-5832,).

 

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. How to get by car to the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve. How to book a room and its price in the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve